Disclaimer

The content of this blog is my personal opinion only. Although I am an employee - currently of Imagination Technologies's MIPS group, in the past of other companies such as Intellectual Ventures, Intel, AMD, Motorola, and Gould - I reveal this only so that the reader may account for any possible bias I may have towards my employer's products. The statements I make here in no way represent my employer's position, nor am I authorized to speak on behalf of my employer. In fact, this posting may not even represent my personal opinion, since occasionally I play devil's advocate.

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Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Using Redundancies to Find Errors

Cleaning out old journals from my bookshelf.

Came across

Yichen Xie, Dawson Engler, "Using Redundancies to Find Errors," IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, pp. 915-928, October, 2003

(actually, a slightly different version in Software Engineering Notes / SIGSOFT 2002/FSE 10.

Very interesting paper: used analysis tools that detected dead code, redundant conditionals, idempotent operations such as x&x to detect bugs.

Causes me to wonder about applying similar techniques to look for hardware/RTL/HDL bugs, e.g. in Verilog or VHDL.

For that matter, it caused me to think about similar hardware techniques. For example, it has been shown that often more than 1/3 of all computations, data movement, etc., are dynamically dead - they will never be used by the program, on its current path of execution. There have been hardware proposals that delay computations, and elide some such dynamically dead code. Something like the flip side of hardware futures.

Now, such dynamic dead code detection *might* help locate bugs - but it suffers because it is dynamic, bound to the current path of execution. Whereas Xie's work looks at reachable code, including paths that may not be currently taken but which might use the values that are dead on the current path.

--

Done in xgcc, so code should be publicly available.

I wish I had had such tools in my last project.

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