Disclaimer

The content of this blog is my personal opinion only. Although I am an employee - currently of Imagination Technologies's MIPS group, in the past of other companies such as Intellectual Ventures, Intel, AMD, Motorola, and Gould - I reveal this only so that the reader may account for any possible bias I may have towards my employer's products. The statements I make here in no way represent my employer's position, nor am I authorized to speak on behalf of my employer. In fact, this posting may not even represent my personal opinion, since occasionally I play devil's advocate.

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Thursday, March 15, 2012

attributes on closing tag (pseudo-XML)

Here's an example of why I like having the ability to place attributes on closing tags in pseudo-XML.  Proper XML only allow attributes on opening tags.

I like using pseudo-XML to structure the output of a test suite. For example:

<test start "foo" >
<test start "bar">
<test "1" passed>
...
</test end "bar" passed=10 failed=0>
<test start "baz">
...
</test end "baz" passed=13 failed=2>
</test end "foo" passed=13 failed=2>

More nicely indented:
<test start "foo" >
    <test start "bar">
        <test "1" passed>
        ...
    </test end "bar" passed=10 failed=0>
    <test start "baz">
    ...
    </test end "baz" passed=13 failed=2>
</test end "foo" passed=13 failed=2>

Anyway, the basic idea is to use pseudo XML ...s to encapsulate test output.

When I translate from pseudo XML to real XML, I can use any of several nice viewers that allow sections to be opened and closed.  E.g. Internet Explorer.

Placing attributes on the closing tag allows me to do such processing in a single pass.  E.g. in a UNIX pipeline:

run-test-suite | collate-results

This is one of the reasons I like being able to place attributes on closing tags: it allows single pass processing.  Often, I am processing some other program's output.

I am fine on eventually converting to standard XML. If necedssary.

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By the way, I do pseudo-XML, like

<test "name" passed assertions=56>

mainly because I find it more human readable than


<test name=-"name" passed="true" assertions="56">

Human readability counts, since there is not such a plethora of XML tools on the UNIX command line that I never look at the raw text.




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